teenagers

Share An Oxford University neuroscientist, Susan Greenfield says that social networking websites like Facebook are causing alarming changes in the brains of young users. Websites such as Facebook and Twitter are said to shorten attention spans, make young people more self-centered, and encourage instant gratification. “We know how small babies need constant reassurance that they exist”, she told the UK’s Daily Mail. “My fear is that these technologies are infantilising the brain into the state of small children who are attracted by buzzing noises and bright lights, who have a small attention span and who live for the moment.”

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Share More than half of teenagers who use the social networking sites like Facebook, MySpace have posted information about sexual behavior, substance abuse/violence and other risky behaviors on their publicly available profiles. And that may attract unwanted attention from sexual predators or jeopardize their future employment prospects

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Share Ask any college student and they will tell you that they have a love-hate relationship with Facebook. They love how it lets them connect with friends all over the world but hates how it seemingly devours their time. However, the scale seems to tip more towards the hate side, as it is now responsible for landing more and more students in sticky situations with the school and the law. Many teens say they know someone who has landed in trouble for a Facebook posting. Teachers and administrators, they say, are cruising Facebook looking for incriminating evidence. Todd from Paul VI Catholic received a “friend request” from someone he thought was a pretty new girl coming to the school. The guys were excited. “She never showed up,” Todd says. He thinks it was an administrator. “I don’t see it being a kid—that’d be the lamest prank ever.”

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