students

Share Researchers at Ohio University has found that students who spend most of their time on Facebook, adding friends, chatting and “poking” others are more likely to perform poorly in exams. Aryn Karpinski, one of the Ohio State education department researchers, was quoted in the Times of London as saying, “Our study shows people who spend more time on Facebook spend less time studying. Every generation has its distractions, but I think Facebook is a unique phenomenon.”

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Share Universities are reviewing their plagiarism policies to clamp down on students who use Facebook to cheat. Plagiarism experts have warned universities and colleges to be aware of students copying from each other when discussing coursework on social networking sites. Gill Rowell, from the consultancy Plagiarism Advice, said universities needed to rework their plagiarism policies with “internet working in mind” but insisted institutions were taking cheating seriously enough.

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Share Ask any college student and they will tell you that they have a love-hate relationship with Facebook. They love how it lets them connect with friends all over the world but hates how it seemingly devours their time. However, the scale seems to tip more towards the hate side, as it is now responsible for landing more and more students in sticky situations with the school and the law. Many teens say they know someone who has landed in trouble for a Facebook posting. Teachers and administrators, they say, are cruising Facebook looking for incriminating evidence. Todd from Paul VI Catholic received a “friend request” from someone he thought was a pretty new girl coming to the school. The guys were excited. “She never showed up,” Todd says. He thinks it was an administrator. “I don’t see it being a kid—that’d be the lamest prank ever.”

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Share A Facebook group called “December 1” posting terrifying invitations to students at Ramapo and Indian Hills high schools to engage in violence. Authorities confirmed the threat and started investigating. “I think they’re going to find out who it is,” senior Jared Horowitz said. “This stuff is easy to trace and everything.”

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